Ramana Maharshi on Jiddu Krishanmurti’s Choiceless Awareness

Ramana jiddu Krishnamurti.png

A young man from Colombo, Ceylon, said to Bhagavan:

J. Krishnamurti teaches the method of effortless and choiceless awareness as distinct from that of deliberate concentration. Would Sri Bhagavan be pleased to explain how best to practise meditation and what form the object of meditation should take?

Ramana Maharshi: Effortless and choiceless awareness is our real nature. If we can attain that state and abide in it, that is all right. But one cannot reach it without effort, the effort of deliberate meditation.

All the age-old vasanas (inherent tendencies) turn the mind outwards to external objects. All such thoughts have to be given up and the mind turned inwards and that, for most people, requires effort. Of course, every teacher and every book tells the aspirant to keep quiet, but it is not easy to do so. That is why all this effort is necessary.

Even if we find somebody who has achieved this supreme state of stillness, you may take it that the necessary effort had already been made in a previous life. So effortless and choiceless awareness is attained only after deliberate meditation.

That meditation can take whatever form most appeals to you. See what helps you to keep out all other thoughts and adopt that for your meditation.

4 thoughts on “Ramana Maharshi on Jiddu Krishanmurti’s Choiceless Awareness

  1. This is the infamous question where the questioner makes a wrong assumption about Krishnamurti’s teaching in framing the question. Ramana Maharishi clarifies the issue very clearly.

    Like

  2. “That meditation can take whatever form most appeals to you. *See what helps you to keep out all other thoughts and adopt that for your meditation.*”

    Hey Tom,

    I hope you’re well! Thank-you for running this site!

    Does the above quote come completely from Ramana Maharshi, rather than just the bolded section?

    And also, if I could ask, what does Ramana Maharshi mean when he said that meditation can take whatever form appeals to one? Does that mean meditate on the Self, or on an image of a beloved deity, or on a virtue, or on love itself, I don’t quite understand this.

    Thank-you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Zain:

      1) the entire quote is from Sri Ramana.

      2) I would say it means that whatever type of meditation works for you is fine, as long as it reduces thoughts

      Best wishes

      Tom

      Like

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